Maynards of East Kentucky

I know it’s a bit of a reach, but if anyone in the audience has an extra copy of The Maynards of East Kentucky laying around, I’d love to borrow it.

In case you can’t read the small print, this is what’s written at the bottom of the cover… “On Brushy Creek in 1813, James Maynard built up the sides of a rock gap and lived in a rude cabin for a year. Here was born the first child on Brushy, Christopher “Kit” Maynard in 1814.”

And, I might add, that Maynard child born on the banks of the Brushy, wasn’t just any child. He was white… The following comes from the publisher of the book.

“This is a book of genealogy of Maynards that were traced back to the Conquest of England by William the Conqueror. It spans ten generations and proudly presents a Maynard as the first white child born on Lower Brushy of Pike County, Kentucky.”

As you can imagine, I’m curious to read the book, if only to find out all the things that my ancestors were the first white people to do. I wouldn’t be surprised if, in addition to giving birth, my ancestors were also the first white people to stub their toes, eat beans, and point out clouds that looked like boobies.

My main reason for wanting to see the book, however, is because I think it might help prove once and for all that I’m related to Lieutenant Robert Maynard of the Royal Navy – the man credited with bringing the pirate Blackbeard to justice in 1718. (According to the story, Maynard and Blackbeard traded shots with pistols. Maynard hit Blackbeard, but didn’t kill him. The two men then clashed with swords, with Blackbeard gaining the advantage. At this point, a man on Maynard’s crew slashed Blackbeard’s throat. The name of that man, however, has been lost to history, illustrating the fact that glory always goes to those in charge.)

This entry was posted in History, Mark's Life, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

23 Comments

  1. cmadler
    Posted June 21, 2011 at 7:23 am | Permalink

    You can probably get it through an inter-library loan:

    http://www.worldcat.org/title/maynards-of-east-kentucky-from-pioneers-to-the-tenth-generation/oclc/6417281

  2. Edward
    Posted June 21, 2011 at 7:46 am | Permalink

    Is a rude cabin like a crude cabin?

  3. Edward
    Posted June 21, 2011 at 7:48 am | Permalink

    “Fifteen Generations of Maynard: From Rude Cabin to Rude Blog.”

  4. Mr. X
    Posted June 21, 2011 at 10:56 am | Permalink

    “Fifteen Generations of Maynards, from pirate killing to ball shaving”

  5. Walt
    Posted June 21, 2011 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    I’ll bet the Maynard who had his assistant kill Blackbeard was afraid to piss at a trough urinal too.

    “Fifteen Generations of Bladder Shyness”

  6. dragon
    Posted June 22, 2011 at 10:43 pm | Permalink

    1 slightly injured possum

    1 cup mayonnaise

    8 cups pig fat

    2 cups buttermilk

    2 fresh green peppers

    Slice green peppers and mix ingredients in a large bowl(exclude possum). Cut possum into chunks or thin strips. Mix possum chunks into bowl. Transfer contents of bowl into a casserole dish and bake at 350 degrees for two hours. Remove from oven, let sit for half an hour, and serve. ENJOY!!

  7. Noah Blach
    Posted June 26, 2011 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

    The Irish had their potato famine, and those of us in Eastern Kentucky had our Maynards. Such is life.

  8. Will Davis
    Posted February 28, 2012 at 10:31 pm | Permalink

    I am publishing a novel and this book on the Maynards plays a key role in it! Just came across your post. Look for it out this summer. Facebook page is up. “When The Shade Comes Over” is the title.

  9. Cassandra Maynard
    Posted April 19, 2012 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    Did you ever get a copy of the book? I hope you respond to this email, as I too would love to read that book. I do know through geneology done by a cousin that I am related to the Maynard’s who founded Maynard, Mass., and also possibly to Robert Maynard of Blackbeard’s downfall.

  10. Richard Maynard
    Posted June 2, 2012 at 4:06 am | Permalink

    I found and read the book at my great grandfather’s farm at Brushy Creek in 1996. My brother then got it, and I haven’t seen it since.

    But this is what little I remember.

    Connection to William the Conqueror are simply alluded to, simply hinting at Norman/Viking ancestry because of height and body build.

    The Maynard’s were the third family to settle in that area East Kentucky, where they lived as bee keepers, farmers, and hunting guides.

    It was “One Eye Kitty”… One day he and Christopher were in the woods hunting and Kitty fell off a ledge and landed on a bear. He had to hang on for dear life while Christopher got into position to shoot the bear at point blank range.

    Confederate troops stayed at the farm after raiding a river boat in Missouri. The soldier positioned to stand guard atop the rock cliff fell asleep and fell off, his satchel broke his fall… along with all the china plates he took from the boat.

    And that’s about it… the rest is gone from my memory.

    http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/u/n/Keith-Muncy/GENE2-0001.html

    The link should help if that’s the line you’re interested in, it starts with William Maynard who came to Wilkes County, North Carolina. Some stories say that the family moved east because it was too “crowded”.

    The chances of being from the pirate killer, the gunsmith dentist, or spy is slim because, while the Maynards started in England, they migrated to Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, South Africa and the Caribbean as well… The probably of being distant cousin is more likely.

  11. Pamela
    Posted February 17, 2013 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    I’ve heard his daughter has or is updating for republication….I’m contacting her through a third party and will let you know!

  12. Posted March 15, 2013 at 10:04 pm | Permalink

    I am a daughter of author, Roland Maynard, I have had the book reprinted, and have copies available. $40.00 includes shipping. Plese contact me for more details.
    plethora0424@yahoo.com
    https://www.facebook.com/messages/pammyannmoore#!/eldoramerle.trimble

  13. Dale Sutherand
    Posted November 19, 2014 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

    I am working on intestate succession of the Estate Estil Maynard Jr of Detroit Michigan.

    His nearest living relatives may be from Williamson West Virginia or from eastern Kentucky through their grand Parents: Young Maynard and his wife Zela. Their kids were Estil Sr., Monroe and Tennessee and others.

    Does the above strike a bell with anyone. Who has a family tree?

    Many thanks.

    Dale
    1 800 598 4439
    suthreld@gmail.com

  14. Angela Maynard Simms
    Posted December 30, 2015 at 10:19 am | Permalink

    I am interested in finding if I am linked with James Maynard. I went to the Gravesite of Isaac Maynard Senior I found out he was the son of James and Charity (Smith) Maynard. I am not sure if this was a typo and if the author was mistaken i.e. Chaney. Their burial ground is located in Pilgrim KY which is in Martin County. You can find this on Find a Grave website. No burial site for James or Chaney. I am sure we are not related to Robert Maynard as he was from England and never settled in the USA.

  15. Eddie Maynard
    Posted April 13, 2016 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

    My dna is matching with this family in pike county, ky and wilkes county, nc. My gg grandmother was,Matilda Maynard b. Abt 1819 Tn. We do not know her parents. On the 1850 monroe county, tn census she is living with a William gray family who was originally from wilkes county nc before moving to monroe co, tn around 1820-30.

    Matilda has 2 children William B. ((JACKSON) maynard b. 1845 and Susan. They have her maiden name. The chikdrens father is one of william grays sons. My Ydna proved I’m a Gray meaning that Matilda was The Maynard.

    I’m wondering if issac is her dad and maybe named after his wife Matilda? Just a theory.

    Also, monroe is not far from jefferson county, tn where some of the Maynards went.

    Can anyone help?

  16. levi maynard
    Posted August 14, 2016 at 5:54 pm | Permalink

    i know that part of our family has done the full genealogy trace. i had to do a family trace back when i was in high school so i was talking to my dad and grandpa kirk maynard and they got a hold of family not sure if it was in WV or KY but it has the listings of names of all relatives and history pictures and stories its amazing i think my dad bought a copy from the family and still has it

  17. Ilene Smith
    Posted December 10, 2016 at 1:12 am | Permalink

    I am also a decendent of Isaac Maynard who was burried on Pigeon Roost at Pilgrim Ky.

  18. Carla Maynard Kobza
    Posted March 8, 2017 at 8:17 am | Permalink

    Looking for anyone that knew Albert Maynard from Lawrence County Kentucky

  19. Sara Maynard
    Posted April 20, 2017 at 10:45 pm | Permalink

    Hope this is still active. My father and his father are mentioned in the book, Douglas and Fred Maynard, respectively. My dad has so many stories, of hope & heartbreak. He had a copy of the book when, I think he said, a college did the original genealogy. He cannot seem to locate it for me but we have some wonderful photos!! I would love to buy a copy of the old or new book. Thank you!

  20. Posted April 21, 2017 at 10:36 am | Permalink

    I am Jack Dempsey Maynard, I was born in Williamson, WVa. in 1928. I have been tracing my genealogy and lt. Robert maynard for many years. I have been told by other reseachers that I am related to Lt. Maynard. William Maynard that came over on the ship BROTHERS, and was born in 1720 is one of my grandfathers. I have been told that William was the son of the Lt. , and that would make me related to the Lt.
    If anyone out there has any info I would shurely appreciate hearing from you
    Jack Dempsey Maynard
    elmgrovemaynard@aol.com

  21. Posted April 21, 2017 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    I am Jack Dempsey Maynard, I was born in Williamson, WVa. in 1928. I have been tracing my genealogy and lt. Robert maynard for many years. I have been told by other reseachers that I am related to Lt. Maynard. William Maynard that came over on the ship BROTHERS, and was born in 1720 is one of my grandfathers. I have been told that William was the son of the Lt. , and that would make me related to the Lt.
    If anyone out there has any info I would shurely appreciate hearing from you
    Jack Dempsey Maynard

  22. james ronnie maynard
    Posted July 21, 2017 at 10:30 pm | Permalink

    i would like to have a copy of the maynard book my dad andrew jackson maynard and his older family is in it but me and my 2 younger sisters are not love to have us put in it if anyone out here can give me some info please contact me 864 847 1826 thank u

  23. Brandon Monroe Maynard
    Posted July 28, 2017 at 10:50 pm | Permalink

    Looking for any information on my late grandfather who passed away a year before I was born. His name was Monroe Maynard, don’t know much at all bout him other rhan he owned and operated a coal mine in pike county, KY back in the 50s maybe? He left my grandmother who was 40 to 50 at the time for a 20 something year old. Any info would be much appreciated. Thanks 6063591302

One Trackback

  1. […] daughter of Roland Maynard, the author of that book I was telling you about not too long ago about the history of my ancestors in Kentucky. Apparently she’s republished the formerly out-fo-print book, and wants to sell me a […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect

Sidetrack ad Aubree’s ad BUY LOCAL... or shop at Amazon through this link Banner Initiative Leisa Thompson