The future of Ypsilanti will apparently be written in tubes

AnnArbor.com is reporting that Ypsilanti’s Visteon plant has sold to Angstrom Capital Holdings, a division of Angstrom USA, a Taylor, Michigan-based supplier of “tubular parts” to the automotive industry. It’s estimated that Angstrom purchased the property for approximately $3 million, which is considerably less than had been sought for the 1 million square foot facility. There has been no word as of yet concerning what will be produced in the gutted former Ford plant, or how many people it will employ. Regardless, this is great news for Ypsilanti, and an encouraging sign that Michigan’s economy might finally be turning the corner. Thank you to everyone who was involved in making this happen. It’s a damned nice way to exit the decade.

[Now, can someone tell me how far the expected tax revenue generated by the plant might go toward offsetting the Water Street bills that are coming due?]

This entry was posted in Other, Ypsilanti and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

29 Comments

  1. Posted December 21, 2009 at 10:44 pm | Permalink

    I was concerned to read, however, that several buildings – some of which date back to the 1880’s – would be destroyed as part of the deal. While I understand that they were in pretty bad shape, it always pains me to hear that artifacts of our industrial past are being destroyed.

  2. Andy Ypsilanti
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 8:42 am | Permalink

    Pete Murdock on this subject at the end of the City Council meeting: “This is the best Christmas present for the city ever” I couldn’t agree more.

  3. Tim
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 9:13 am | Permalink

    Not to look a gift horse in the mouth, but didn’t we declare war on a country not too long ago because someone thought they might be manufacturing aluminum tubes?

  4. tommy
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    Totally tubular, fer sure!

  5. Meta
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 10:07 am | Permalink

    According to AnnArbor.com, there may be as many as 400 employees.

    His ultimate goal, Palakurthi said, is to consolidate his company’s manufacturing operations and move some of Angstrom’s 400 global jobs to the Ypsilanti property.

    More:
    http://www.annarbor.com/business-review/buyer-of-ex-visteon-factory-in-ypsilanti-will-use-site-for-manufacturing/

  6. Jon
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 11:10 am | Permalink

    Wasn’t part of this plant one of Henry Ford’s original factories on the river, like the one in Northville that is now a mixed-use office building? If so, then the developer could make a good case for historic designation and a lot of money in state and federal tax credits (historic and brownfield) by incorporating those original buildings in his redevelopment plans.

  7. Posted December 22, 2009 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    She’s a beauty.

  8. Curt Waugh
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 12:50 pm | Permalink

    The article makes no mention of any tax abatements. I’m hope the omission is genuine. As the city wasn’t involved in negotiations, I suspect there were none from us at least. This is, indeed, an excellent Christmas present for the city.

  9. Burt Reynolds
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 1:04 pm | Permalink

    Mark
    Posted December 21, 2009 at 10:44 pm | Permalink
    I was concerned to read, however, that several buildings – some of which date back to the 1880’s – would be destroyed as part of the deal. While I understand that they were in pretty bad shape, it always pains me to hear that artifacts of our industrial past are being destroyed.

    No offense Mark, but they can tear down the Water Tower at this point if it will help my property value.

  10. Edward
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 1:04 pm | Permalink

    Seriously, tubes = terrorism.

    No joke.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraqi_aluminum_tubes

  11. Dirtgrain
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 1:14 pm | Permalink

    Property value?

  12. the kingpin
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

    Are you kidding? 400 long term jobs, a factory and all that goes with those two things VS. a few dusty old ramshackle buildings?!? Anyone concerned about the buildings…line up. You all get kicks in the private parts.

  13. Keffo
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

    I don’t think anyone was arguing that the company shouldn’t come here, King Pinhead, so you can put aside your nut squashing fantasies. All that was said is that it would be a shame if it was an original Ford building that was slated for demolition. No one said to stop anything though.

  14. FedUpwithYpsi
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    Really Mark..?!? Save your tears for something more important. If it pains you so much to hear about “artifacts of our industrial past” being destroyed – move to Detroit or Pittsburg and you can start a 501 c(3). You can name the org – “saving crappy old buildings for no particular reason”.

  15. Oliva
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 6:10 pm | Permalink

    According to AnnArbor.com, there may be as many as 400 employees.

    His ultimate goal, Palakurthi said, is to consolidate his company’s manufacturing operations and move some of Angstrom’s 400 global jobs to the Ypsilanti property.

    Am imagining one of these “global” employee’s child becoming best friends with a child already living here, several times over, and other unlikely pairings, new stores, etc., that could result. So exciting.

    I think I once mentioned an encounter at the P.O. with a woman who’d moved here from Mississippi to work at the Ford plant many, many moons ago. She said there were women working there who’d go out to the parking lot at lunch and sell their bodies, so to speak, so they worked two jobs–is how she put it. (She didn’t like it a bit.)

  16. Posted December 22, 2009 at 6:56 pm | Permalink

    Yeahhhh… I’d rather not get kicked in the nuts for saying that I don’t like to see old buildings be destroyed. And, for what it’s worth, I didn’t suggest that the foundation of an old building was more important that jobs. I like 400 jobs, and I’d be willing to put up with a lot to see them materialize. It would be cool, however, if the buildings they’re talking about tearing down were first documented in some way. I used to be a historic archeologist, and that’s the kind of work that I did. We rarely stopped development, but at least we documented everything… So, go kick yourself in the nuts.

    Merry Christmas.

  17. What's In A Name
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 8:54 pm | Permalink

    There’s nothing saying that Angstrom USA won’t be applying for tax credits. In this economy any smart company is going to ask for everything they can get. I say you’ll see quite a few tax credit/abatement requests when they get to the renovation/build out phase of the building.

  18. Brent
    Posted December 22, 2009 at 9:03 pm | Permalink

    Yes, at the very least HABS/HAER documentation would be appropriate prior to demolition. There are always grad students in EMU’s Historic Preservation department looking for final projects (and some, like yours truly, who are commenting on markmaynard.com instead of finishing their own final project) that could tackle the documentation prior to demo.

  19. kingpin
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 8:51 am | Permalink

    When I said “kicked in the private parts”, I meant the arm. Geez! The arm, with it’s soft whispy blonde hair sprinkled across it’s forearm…the seductive curves of the elbows…the smooth gyrations of a supple wrist…mmmm…up over the rigid bicep, catching just a glimpse of the dark moist pit….

  20. ytown
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 9:30 am | Permalink

    Tim and Edward, LET IT GO. You can do it. Do something else with your lives. Move on .

  21. Alice
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 10:54 am | Permalink

    Knowing how dangerous they are, I don’t want aluminum tubes being made in Ypsilanti. I’m starting a group called No Tubes No Terror.

  22. John Gawlas
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    I would speculate that they may be moving their operations from Taylor. Angstrom USA LLC notes 35 non union employees and 8 engineers under “infrastructure” on their website. I will also guess that India and South Korea have to do with the raw production of stainless tubing. Remember, in Paula’s posting, the company stated that they may move “some of the 400 global jobs”.

    Still, this is fabulous news and helps to explain the demolition discussion previously revealed by the city for the ACH site.

  23. Posted December 23, 2009 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

    No Tim and Edward,

    tubes = the internets

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cZC67wXUTs

  24. Leadfoot
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 10:21 pm | Permalink

    Hey Kingpin!

    I googled Kingpin and Ypsilanti and found this among the first things:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/59251577@N00/page2/

    So tell me if that’s you or not cause if it is I’m gonna come up on stage and kick your balls through yur eye sockets at mittenfest.

    Haw haw. I mean your elbows.

  25. Posted December 24, 2009 at 11:30 am | Permalink

    Oh, shit! An alias has be cracked… And balls and pits are about to be pummeled.

  26. Posted December 30, 2009 at 9:38 pm | Permalink

    Not that I’m hoping to see anything happen, but I plan to be there at 9:10, January 2, with my camera, just in case.

  27. kingpin
    Posted December 31, 2009 at 9:19 am | Permalink

    Leadfoot…you better dip those big size 8 and a halfs in some titanium! To quote Jaws…”We’re gonna need a bigger “…boot.
    Can’t wait for Mittenfest, though. I hope to see you all there. Hey…I’d take a kick in the nuts for a good cause….or the armpit….preferably the armpit.

  28. Posted December 31, 2009 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    That’s the spirit!

    This is going to be an awesome Mittenfest ball-stomping!

  29. Meta
    Posted May 7, 2013 at 8:48 am | Permalink

    Apparently not. Angstrom is selling the building.

    From AnnArbor.com:

    Less than three years after promising to bring hundreds of new jobs to Washtenaw County, Angstrom USA, LLC is looking to sell or lease its plant facilities in Ypsilanti. Angstrom is looking to shed all or part of the 715,000-square foot property, listing it with Signature Associatiates, the same company that managed Angstrom’s purchase of the property.

    Parts of the former Visteon plant owned by Angstrom USA have already been demolished.
    A sign advertising the vacant lot next to the plant has been on display at the property, located at 126 Spring Street, for over a year. Angstrom bought the property from Automotive Components Holdings LLC in late 2009. The plant, previously 1 million square feet, had been a Visteon facility. Parts of the plant have already been demolished.

    Read more:
    http://annarbor.com/business-review/large-lot-next-to-former-ypsilanti-visteon-plant-listed-for-lease-or-sale-by-angstrom-usa/

One Trackback

  1. By Ypsilanti budget woes on January 1, 2010 at 10:27 pm

    […] the recent sale of the Visteon plant, and the associated jobs that are to come along with it, will mitigate this to some extent, but, […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect

Sidetrack ad Aubree’s ad BUY LOCAL... or shop at Amazon through this link Banner Initiative coal mining kids