Saying, “It is what it is,” Donald Trump announces that we will be giving the Saudis a pass on the cold-blooded murder of Jamal Khashoggi, an American resident and Washington Post reporter

Today, Donald Trump issued an extremely unusual official statement from the White House on the October 2 murder in Istanbul of United States resident Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist. After declaring the world to be “a very dangerous place,” the President, in his statement, made the case as to why, in his opinion, even if Khashoggi’s murder was ordered by Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, and carried out by a 15-person Saudi assassination squad, we should look the other way, as we rely on Saudi oil, and want to keep selling the royal family our American fighter jets and advanced weapons systems. The bottom line, Donald Trump said, after parroting Saudi talking points about Khashoggi being an “enemy of the state,” and a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, is that “The United States intends to remain a steadfast partner of Saudi Arabia.” [Khashoggi, by the way, was not a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, and, in fact, considered them a terrorist organization.]

In his official statement on the matter, Donald Trump makes it a point to reiterate that we cannot know for certain that the assassination of Khashoggi, which we know was carried out by 15 Saudis who had flown into Istanbul with bone saws for dismembering his body, was called for by Mohammed bin Salman. “Our intelligence agencies continue to assess all information,” Trump said, “but it could very well be that the Crown Prince had knowledge of this tragic event… maybe he did, and maybe he didn’t!”

Maybe he did, and maybe he didn’t! [The exclamation point is Trump’s.]

Well, according to the CIA, it would appear as though he did.

Four days ago, the following ran in the Washington Post, in a feature titled, “CIA concludes Saudi crown prince ordered Jamal Khashoggi’s assassination.”

…The CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the assassination of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last month, contradicting the Saudi government’s claims that he was not involved in the killing, according to people familiar with the matter.

The CIA’s assessment, in which officials have said they have high confidence, is the most definitive to date linking Mohammed to the operation and complicates the Trump administration’s efforts to preserve its relationship with a close ally. A team of 15 Saudi agents flew to Istanbul on government aircraft in October and killed Khashoggi inside the Saudi Consulate, where he had gone to pick up documents that he needed for his planned marriage to a Turkish woman.

In reaching its conclusions, the CIA examined multiple sources of intelligence, including a phone call that the prince’s brother Khalid bin Salman, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, had with Khashoggi, according to the people familiar with the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the intelligence. Khalid told Khashoggi, a contributing columnist to The Washington Post, that he should go to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul to retrieve the documents and gave him assurances that it would be safe to do so.

It is not clear if Khalid knew that Khashoggi would be killed, but he made the call at his brother’s direction, according to the people familiar with the call, which was intercepted by U.S. intelligence…

So, once again, Donald Trump is taking the side of a despot over his own intelligence agencies. The CIA told him that they knew Mohammed bin Salman had his brother call Jamal Khashoggi, telling him that it would be safe for him to go to the embassy, and we know that 15 Saudis with bone saws were dispatched at the same time to meet him. And yet our President says that we don’t know for certain that Mohammed bin Salman was involved.

When asked about all of this today at Mar-a-Lago, where he’d gone to golf, Donald Trump said, “It’s a shame, but it is what it is.” He then added, “For me, very simple, America first. Saudi, if we broke with them, your oil prices would go through the roof.

By the way, that’s Mohammed bin Salman at the top of this post, sitting in the Oval Office with Donald Trump in March of this year. During the meeting, Donald Trump said, “It’s a great honor to have the Crown Prince with us. Saudi Arabia has been a very great friend… we’ve become very good friends over a short period of time.” Of course, it hasn’t really been a short period of time. As we know, Donald Trump has a very long, profitable, and well-documented history with the Saudi royal family.

“I make a lot of money with them,” Donald Trump has said publicly of the Saudis in the past, adding “I love Saudi Arabia. The people are very nice to me. They buy my apartments like you wouldn’t believe. It’s true. They’ll pay me anything.” And, of course, it’s not just that, according to Trump, they bought $40 and $50 million apartments from him before he was elected president. He’s also continued to benefit from them at president, as they continue to spend great sums of money at Trump properties. So, if you’re wondering why, as Republican Senator Bob Corker put it so eloquently today, “(the) White House would moonlight as a public relations firm for the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia,” I think we have a pretty good sense as to why that is. And I think, once the Democrats take control of the house on January 3, and start holding hearings, we’re going to know a whole lot more. [For a full list of Trump’s financial entanglements with the Saudis that we’re already aware of, click here.]

Interesting, Donald Trump isn’t always so reticent to take action against people. In fact, we just learned today that he attempted to use the Department of Justice to investigate his perceived enemies, like Hillary Clinton and James Comey. So, for what it’s worth, he is willing to use the U.S. government to go after women who send emails from private accounts, and men who he sees as being “nut jobs.” He just draws the line when it comes to going after dictators who kill innocent journalists for exercising their right to free speech as American residents.

I get that we’re addicted to oil, and that we feel as though we need a strong ally in the Middle East, but, as we were just saying yesterday, we also know that we need to make a break from oil if we want for humanity to survive. So this isn’t just a question of us not wanting to do business with a regime that we find morally repugnant. We know that we need to get away from them anyway if we want to survive. The product that they’re selling is quite literally killing us.

It’s like we just discovered that our crack dealer had our neighbor dismembered, and yet we’re sitting around trying to justify it, when we know, deep in our hearts, that we should be running into rehab, and looking to cut a deal with law enforcement.

But here we are, doubling down on the addiction, and making excuses for our dealer, instead of doing the right correct, moral, and responsible thing… which would be to cut off military funding to the Saudis, and initiate an aggressive transition to renewable energy.

I know it might make things rough for a while, but how about, for a start, taking this opportunity to throw the alternative energy switch in a big way, taking back that $1.5 trillion we gave to American’s most wealthy, and instead using it to fund alternative energy installations around the country? What about instituting aggressive tax breaks for people putting solar installations on their homes, and changing the laws to allow for people to seek energy back to the grid? And what about reinstitution those Obama era fuel efficiency standards that the Trump administration just recently scrapped?

One last thing. Let’s not forget that 15 out of the 19 hijackers who attacked our country on 9/11 were Saudis, and their government never paid a price for the role they played… I think there are ample reasons not to give them another chance here.

update: It’s now a few days later, and Trump continues to defend Mohammed bin Salman from the accusations of our intelligence community, in much the same way he defended Vladimir Putin from charges of having interfered in our 2016 election. “Whether he did it, or whether he didn’t,” Trump said of Mohammed bin Salman’s participation in the Khashoggi murder, “he denies it vehemently.” Our President then adds, “Do people really want me to give up hundreds of thousands of jobs? And frankly, if we went by this standard, we wouldn’t have anybody as an ally.” This, of course, is a lie.

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43 Comments

  1. John Brown
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 5:56 am | Permalink

    I watch Nightly Business Report to monitor the oligarchs. A couple weeks ago there was an analyst discussing how the Saudis are angling to disrupt OPEC and partner with Russia on oil market control.

    Putin and the Saudis both own that Stooge Agent Orange. The answer is crystal clear and it was reported on PBS, not Q.

  2. John Brown
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 6:46 am | Permalink

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN1MD0Y8

    But now the stock market has dropped +1000pts and oil is tanking, which runs US frackers out of business. So it’s evil, but maybe not so much genius.

  3. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 7:41 am | Permalink

    Remember when Bernie thought the Saudis could handle Middle East diplomacy if the US withdrew from foreign policy leadership there?

    Clinton wasn’t much better, but at least she knew they needed to be heavily ‘managed,’ even if that meant buying their fealty with weapon sales.

    We should have dumped the Saudis 30 years ago. We’d be much better off now on many levels had we done so.

  4. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 7:51 am | Permalink

    Where is Hw on this? Remember when he said bin Salman was a reformer like Trump who would bring great things to his country. Remember when he said he is right about EVERYTHING. Where is Q on all of this? I’d love to hear how they spin this. I’m guessing it’s something like the CIA had Kashoggi killed by the Turks to make it look like the Saudi’s did it in order to disrupt Trump and bin Salman’s reforms of corruption in the US and SA.

  5. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 8:13 am | Permalink

    Oh, it’s better than I thought. It seems the Qanon folks have dug up some connection between Msfud and Kashoggi and so believe the CIA had Kashoggi killed to 1) drive a wedge between Trump and MbS (which makes Trump a hero for his loyalty to MbS) 2)threaten Msfud who Qanon people believe has information that will bring down the whole house (aka deep state).

    Anything bad that happens must be the doing of the CIAClintons. That is the premise from which everything else is woven in Qanon theory.

  6. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 8:21 am | Permalink

    Oh and the CIA is targeting MbS because, as a great reformer, he is no longer supplying them with funding for their deep state. The Great Awakening indeed.

  7. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 8:38 am | Permalink

    Mifsud* pardon misspelling.

  8. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 9:02 am | Permalink

    Never forget that it is liberal pro-fracking democrats like JH and Obama that have made the US the number 1 oil producer in the world. Never forget that they aided and abetted the fracking financial bubble that is popping as we speak. Never forget that it was the liberals who gave Snyder the Governorship and his support of the fracking economy led to the Flint water crises. JH, every time I see you take a gratuitous shot at Bernie, I will remind folks of your support for the death industries of oil fracking and nuclear power. And you are fine with the Saudi’s it seems as long as we “manage” them. You will no doubt line up behind a 3rd campaign by HRC so as to ensure Trump or Pence a second term.

  9. Anonymous
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 9:42 am | Permalink

    https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-statement-on-khashoggi-reveals-dark-secret-of-us-policy-2018-11

    What’s done is done. Moving forward is full of least terrible choices.

  10. Frank Luntz by proxy
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 9:57 am | Permalink

    Nothing says “America First!” like believing the Saudis over U.S. intel.

    https://twitter.com/FrankLuntz/status/1064948529959858177

  11. anonymous
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:03 am | Permalink

    Retired General Wesley Clark on CNN: “When we align ourselves with nations that don’t share our values, and we think we’re pursuing our national interest, we’re actually undercutting our most powerful appeal, our most powerful— Call it a weapon. It’s American values.”

  12. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:23 am | Permalink

    Been trying to find out HRC’s position relative to the Khashoggi murder. Can’t find a single published utterance from the person who helped bring slave markets back to the middle east. Bernie Sanders has been linking illegal US involvement in the ongoing genocide in Yemen to the Khashoggi murder for over a month. Can’t find any comments from the great HRC on either US support for the Yemen genocide or the evil that is the House of Saud.

    https://www.facebook.com/senatorsanders/videos/431241664368361/

  13. FFT
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:37 am | Permalink

    wobblie, you are aware that HRC is not our president, right? in fact, she holds no elected position.

  14. Demetrius
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:43 am | Permalink

    Every American president puts their own unique spin on foreign policy, and yesterday’s extraordinary statement is no exception.

    Clearly, under “Trump Doctrine,” the United States will henceforth ignore, dismiss, or even justify otherwise credible charges of gruesome murder (including those of prominent journalists and legal US residents) by other nations – to prevent any disruption to the unending funneling of public of wealth to powerful benefactors of US imperialism, such as Boing, Raytheon, and General Dynamics.

    The Trump Doctrine all but declares “open season” on journalists, activists, and dissidents around the world … and says to nations that hope or plan to take similar actions that they can rest assured knowing the US has got their back.

  15. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:49 am | Permalink

    FFT, You bet. The Dems are floating her name for candidate in 2020. Seems like if she wants to be a leader, she should step up and let us know what she thinks. By the way while the Khashoggi incident has been playing out the House of Saud beheaded an Indonesian woman who had defended herself against a rapist. Also they have had imprisoned a number of woman activist for months. If HRC is just going to return to being a private citizen, more power to her. If she is contemplating another run for President, then don’t be a shrinking violet. Let us know what you think (but that has always been her problem, telling people one thing in private and taking a different position in public).

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/saudi-womens-rights-advocates-reportedly-abused-while-in-prison/2018/11/20/9e77f11c-ebfb-11e8-9236-bb94154151d2_story.html?fbclid=IwAR3zaQrXywsk83cj9yPH58xiT3sDc2_B4nzmvk151E5AkPoMe5dpLH3fxbU&utm_term=.844ba8f572aa

  16. Sad
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 10:59 am | Permalink

    Maybe you could get a ticket Wobblie.

    https://www.aneveningwiththeclintons.com/

  17. FFT
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 11:09 am | Permalink

    “The Dems are floating her name for candidate in 2020”

    If you really think that it’s the Dems who are floating her name as a candidate, you’re a bigger moron than I thought.

  18. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:03 pm | Permalink

    Wobblie you understand that cheap domestic natural gas poses an existential threat to coal production and domestic oil production offers us energy independence from the middle east, right? I have said repeatedly that I support fracking with much more regulation as a transition fuel. Should it be necessary? No. But given the inability of proselytizers to dial back personal consumption or produce a renewable alternative, I’ll take market forces to wean us off of fossil fuels and foreign fossil fuels.

    I agree that Obama and HRC kissed too much Saudi ass. I have made that very clear for a decade. I understand why they did it; I think it was strategically weak. At least they understood the need to manage the Saudis. Bernie was an idiot about FP. How can you be in the Senate for 30 years and not understand anything that basic about fp?

    I can tell by your reaction that you feel embarrassed by him. You shouldnt be. No politician is all right all the time. It was Bernie’s own campaign that presented him as so virtuous as to be without fault (except for frumpiness, but that was seen as a virtue right?)

    Go back to HRC and Bernie’s FP debate and tell me where they diverge and he shows himself to be less hawkish in a way informed enough that it doesn’t sound like it would lead to more death, oppression and war?

  19. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

    Wobblie–I would not support HRC or Bernie in a primary. I would support whoever the DNC nominee is in the general.

    I don’t expect her to run. No way. I feel confident Bernie will need to be talked out of it.

    HRC’s relative quiet during all this mess of the past two years, including the latest, would seem to indicate she’s not going to run.

  20. Lynne
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:13 pm | Permalink

    Re: “every time I see you take a gratuitous shot at Bernie, I will remind folks of your support for the death industries of oil fracking and nuclear power.”

    I think that is one of Bernie’s great flaws. He should be supporting nuclear power and fracking because we need to reduce carbon emissions NOW. Fracking and the replacement of natural gas for coal actually has done a lot to reduce emissions. Yeah yeah, I know. Solar and Wind would have been better just like it would have been better to have some super liberal president. Not realistic though. So instead, in part because of how YOU voted wobblie, we have Trump and the ONLY bright spot there in terms of climate change is that fracking has reduced emissions in spite of the political situation.

  21. Lynne
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:32 pm | Permalink

    At any rate, all I can say that is that Trump’s foreign policy is pretty messed up and this is a good example of that. Somehow I am not at all surprised that Trump is ok with a powerful man using his power to murder. I am pretty sure that fits in with his moral outlook on the world which is clearly that powerful men get to do whatever they want.

  22. Anonymous
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

    “I bet you’d be on my side if I had killed a journalist. #BeBest”

    – Michelle Wolf

    How true is this. Trump has your back.

  23. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    Lynn, do you want to build nuclear power plants ala Chernoybol ie. without concrete containment shells? The amount of concrete necessary to contain the radioactive components of a nuclear power plant is enormous. In addition the CO2 emission in the mining and production of nuclear fuel is high. Here is a link to the relative amount of CO2 emissions produced by various forms of energy generation. Atomic power is clearly “better” than coal or gas, but still produces twice as much CO2 in its production cycle than wind or solar. In addition the build out time for nuclear is some thing like a decade. While the rest of the world is rapidly developing much cleaner renewable generation sources our “liberal” intelligentsia continues to be slaves to the carbon industries.

    https://timeforchange.org/co2-emission-nuclear-power-stations-electricity

    The New Green Deal is actually a program that could solve many of our energy/climate issues. Being an “incrementalist” is being pro-death at this point. The IPC is notoriously conservative in its projections of global warming. They say we have 12 years—most scientist who actually study the feedback loops that are being generated by global warming are much more pessimistic.
    Fracking and nuclear power will do nothing to “reduce carbon emissions NOW”, fracking does the exact opposite, and nuclear is a pie in the sky pipe dream. By the time enough nuclear power plants are on line to make a difference–they won’t. Time is not on our side.

    Just keep finding scape goats, that will make everything better.
    https://timeforchange.org/co2-emission-nuclear-power-stations-electricity

  24. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

    I just posted a rather lengthy response to you Lynn, but it disappeared into the ether. Here is the gist though. Nuclear is not as bad as coal for CO2, but is still produces twice as much CO2 in its production cycle than wind or solar. The build out time for nuclear is about 10 years. The latest IPC report believes we only have 12 years. The IPC is notoriously conservative in its projections. Most scientist who study the feedback loops being generated by global warming do not believe we have a decade. Fracking is the worst form of CO2 generating activity imaginable. Here is a link to how nuclear is a CO2 generator.

    http://theconversation.com/is-nuclear-power-zero-emission-no-but-it-isnt-high-emission-either-41615

  25. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

    Here is a short fact sheet put out by some Canadians on CO2 emissions and fracking.

    https://canadians.org/sites/default/files/publications/fracking-climate-change.pdf

    Empowering the carbon industries is tantamount to signing our children’s death warrants.

  26. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 1:07 pm | Permalink

    JH, are you aware that Scotland produced all the electricity necessary to power the country from wind in October? Are you aware that Denmark is well on the way to powering its entire economy using renewables? China is busy closing coal mines as they bring more and more renewable s on line. As you wait for the invisible hand of the “markets” to bring about a clean energy future you condemn your children to a growing level of impoverishment, both economically and ecologically. We are in the midst of a great extinction event, you are aware of that right? The “market” did not bring about electrification–Government programs like the TVA and the Rural electrification programs did—The magic of the markets will simply lead us to ruin and leave our children with a totally impoverished existence.

  27. site admin
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 1:19 pm | Permalink

    Your comment for Lynn did not disappear, Wobblie. It was just hung up in the system, waiting for approval. It has since been approved and posted.

  28. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

    Wobblie– I am aware of all of those things. I also know the US is not the size of scotland nor does it have it’s wind resources per capita. That was also one month… MI probably produces that much wind power in a good month. I am only putting my faith in the markets and the tech sector because the US government has been so unbelievably slow. The argument that markets alone cause impoverishment and environmental degradation is patently untrue. Plenty of evidence worldwide about that. China is a good one. I believe in a high degree of socialization, Wobblie. I’m waiting for us to get there. Meanwhile I’ll take what I can get. Ideology is not going to save us from extinction. I’d rather we survive than be right. Humans are the only species on the planet that is likely to extinct itself. We are truly the dumbest creatures. And that’s all of us– left, right and middle. I’m unwilling to get righteous about climate action. I feel the urgency; That’s why.

  29. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    JH, there are currently 14 reactors in the planning/building stages here in the US. Obama granted the first building permits for new nukes in 2012. The ones under construction are in fact open air reactors (ie. they will not have the massive containment shell we associated with Fermi and others), and are still nearly a decade away from completion. The 12 planned are expected to have the necessary technological advances (ie. they will be small modular reactors) necessary to build them by 2025. You are prepared to wait for the “market” while the bottom falls out of the environment. By 2025 over half of the 12 years the IPC gives us will be gone, and we will just be starting to build your wonderful nukes. Solar and wind have much less of a turn around time. Despite the failures of our government to support renewables as we should they now produce almost as much electricity in this country as nuclear (nukes at about 19% vs renewables at 18%) The Green New Deal could dramatically change those numbers in less than a decade. It could in fact give your children and grandchildren a fighting chance for a decent life. ” Humans are the only species on the planet that is likely to extinct itself.” only because we are slaves to outmoded and destructive “incrementalism” in the face of an existential crises.

  30. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

    I was off some. There are 5 reactors under construction. Some maybe generating electricity by the end of the decade. The only reason they are being built is because Georgia and South Carolina is allowing the utility to charge customers for them now, instead of after they get built. They have been charging the customers for the non-exsitent reactors since 2012. That sounds like the markets at work. How about you pay for your car or house before we build it, and you will get to use it some time 10 years from now.

  31. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

    By the way JH, average per capita income in China (not a market driven economy, but a Communist command economy with some private enterprises ie. a mixed economy) has gone from $2000 a year two decades ago to $8000 per year, a 15% increase every year for 20 years. During that same time the US (also a mixed economy based primarily on our command/ defense spending) has had a stagnate economy with per capita income barely keeping up with the 1.5 to 2% inflation a year.

    “Markets” are like “guns” a fetish that is the answer only to those who deny creative responses.

  32. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    For all the loathing of Sanders I see here, he at least is trying to make a difference on the most important issue of our time.

    https://www.nationofchange.org/2018/11/20/solving-out-climate-crisis-bernie-sanders-to-host-a-national-town-hall-on-climate-change/?fbclid=IwAR1IE7xEIqRnM7GR6zdeqxu7nvPxC74EQwB3YSFrIqq4fzZQLCF9wbUgbNo

  33. wobblie
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    Continuing on my anti-nuke rants, I did not hear anything about this in the media. Media concentration (thank you Bill Clinton) has fragmented and regionalized news coverage in ways that people didn’t imagine. Getting news other than that deemed National is getting harder to come by. Here is a story I just saw on Counter Punch on an aspect of the California fires that people didn’t imagine.

    https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/11/16/wolsey-fire-burns-toxic-santa-susana-reactor-site/?fbclid=IwAR1eKYFu-0qPnwy5E36-WiUZgnyCoeqAtjnde53lnuaVKqycU76tWF02Ykw

    Not only is it earthquakes and tsunamis and human error we have to worry about with Nukes– its out of control wildfires.

  34. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 7:33 pm | Permalink

    Yes wobbllie, the average Chinese worker’s life improved after they opened up to a market economy and globalized. Percentage growth from dirt poor is impressive. And agai. Due to competitive global markets. But their population is still underpaid relative to US workers. And their environmental air quality, building standards etc are still much worse. I have no doubt that things will continue to improve there such that our workers and manufacturing will become more competitive. Because markets.

  35. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 7:35 pm | Permalink

    I believe I said that I support all kind sof solutions, including market solutions. That’s true. Denying market solutions in a market economy is idiotic and best. A death wish for humanity (climate change) at worst.

  36. Jean Henry
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 7:37 pm | Permalink

    The discourse here is getting so dumb as to be painful.

  37. Lynne
    Posted November 21, 2018 at 8:18 pm | Permalink

    If it makes you feel better, wobblie, climate change and the depletion of aquifers is forcing farmers to do other things with their land and one of those other things is wind power. I know, I know, it is market force wind power so probably not pure enough for you but still…wind!

  38. Hyborian Warlord
    Posted November 22, 2018 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    “Where is Hw on this? Remember when he said bin Salman was a reformer like Trump who would bring great things to his country. Remember when he said he is right about EVERYTHING. Where is Q on all of this? I’d love to hear how they spin this. I’m guessing it’s something like the CIA had Kashoggi killed by the Turks to make it look like the Saudi’s did it in order to disrupt Trump and bin Salman’s reforms of corruption in the US and SA.”

    Q has not talked about Jamal Khashoggi. Where am I? Trying to understand the reality as always. Bin Salman has made many, many, many rich and powerful enemies as has Donald Trump. Agreed? The other thing that keeps nagging is Jamal was the nephew of Adnan, the billionaire arms dealer implicated in 9-11. Something must up with that.

  39. Hyborian Warlord
    Posted November 22, 2018 at 9:43 am | Permalink

    Remember when you all thought he was going to flip on President Trump? George Proper-drop-on-us:

    https://twitter.com/GeorgePapa19/status/1064995722947436544

    Can’t forget this: Joseph Mifsud was on Khashoogi’s payroll. This was no ordinary “journalist,” just like Mifsud was no ordinary “academic.” That Mifsud-Khashoogi connection is much deeper than many realize. I witnessed it in London.

    So wtf?

  40. Posted November 22, 2018 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    update: It’s now a few days later, and Trump continues to defend Mohammed bin Salman from the accusations of our intelligence community, in much the same way he defended Vladimir Putin from charges of having interfered in our 2016 election. “Whether he did it, or whether he didn’t,” Trump said of Mohammed bin Salman’s participation in the Khashoggi murder, “he denies it vehemently.” Our President then adds, “Do people really want me to give up hundreds of thousands of jobs? And frankly, if we went by this standard, we wouldn’t have anybody as an ally.” This, of course, is a lie.

  41. Posted November 22, 2018 at 11:19 am | Permalink

    For those of you who might not have see it yet, Karen Attiah, the Global Opinions editor for the Washington Post, has posted a list of actions that she’d like to see taken by Congress in the wake of her colleague’s murder. I’d encourage you to read them.

  42. Hyborian Warlord
    Posted November 22, 2018 at 9:04 pm | Permalink

    Whistleblower Sibel Edmonds dropping bombs on your bitch ass or just beein’ a dumb conspeeericy theeerist?

    https://twitter.com/sibeledmonds

  43. BBC
    Posted November 27, 2018 at 6:10 pm | Permalink

    “‘I Don’t Speak Arabic’: John Bolton Says He Won’t Listen to Tape of Khashoggi Killing Because He Won’t Understand It”

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