What Scott Brown’s win in Massachusetts tonight means

Well, it looks as though Republican Scott Brown has won Teddy Kennedy’s Senate seat in Massachusetts, ending the Democrats super-majority, and possibly with it healthcare reform. Some, like the MM.com reader who calls himself Edge of Sprawl (quoted below), feel as though this marks some kind of huge turning point in American history, where regular everyday people, emboldened by Glenn Beck, tea parties and the like, turned against the socialism of the left. I think, however, that the opposite is more likely true, at least in this case. I think that had Obama come out and fought hard for meaningful healthcare reform, instead of playing it safe, that Martha Coakley would have won tonight. The people of Massachusetts aren’t stupid, and they aren’t, generally speaking, Republicans. Knowing how important the 60 vote majority is, I believe, they would have been there for the President, had he given them something meaningful to rally around. But, instead they stayed home. It may have been a miserably run campaign, and she may have been a less than stellar candidate, but I think a majority of the blame for this one lies with Obama. And, now, I guess, all that’s left to do is just sit back and watch the stock market run wild as investors place their bets on the side of corporate America… Oh, and here’s that incendiary comment by EOS:

Circle the date on your calendars! The people have put an end to the Federal takeover. If you like tonight’s results, just wait till next November. Those Democrats not on the extreme left will be trying to buy their redemption with a no vote on the second attempt of the health bill.

The Senate lost their super majority and the House will never approve the Senate version that mandates federal funding of abortion. The buyouts of Ben Nelson, Landrieu, and the unions pushed the limits. The closed door meetings and lack of transparency were the fatal blows that sealed the defeat of this administration.

And if the Republicans think that we’re in for another round of musical chairs, exchanging one corrupt party for another, they will be sadly mistaken as well.

update: To balance things out a bit, I thought that perhaps it made sense to also move this comment by Glen S up to the front page.

I’m not optimistic this will happen, but I hope the Massachusetts vote will be a “wake-up” call to the Obama administration that they need to stop chasing the illusion of bipartisanship (and stop kissing Joe Lieberman’s ass), and instead begin fighting on the side of the American people regarding the issues that got them elected in the first place — jobs, the economy and health care reform.

First, he needs to push a second stimulus plan that begins putting people to work — immediately. By this, I mean less tax-credits and incentives… and more FDR-style jobs programs that take people out of unemployment lines and gets them earning a salary while contributing to the rebuilding of America’s crumbling infrastructure.

Second, he needs to fire Geithner, Summers, Bernanke, etc., and send an unequivocal message to Wall Street and the banks that the days of “Too Big to Fail” are over, and that going forward, we are going to encourage financial services that encourage savings and investment in REAL products and services and REAL jobs; while discouraging the flow of dollars into speculation, arbitrage and disastrous commodity “bubbles.”

Third, he needs to work with the Congressional Democratic leadership to scrap the ridiculous House and Senate health care “reform” bills as they currently exist, and begin working immediately to craft legislation that taxes the wealthiest Americans in order to create a strong public insurance option that guarantees an affordable, quality choice for all.

Finally, he needs to re-instate Howard Dean and DNC chair, and let him begin rebuilding the brilliant 50-state strategy that was so successful in allowing the Democrats to regain their House and Senate majorities, and which, frankly, played a major role in Obama getting elected in the first place.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

46 Comments

  1. Posted January 19, 2010 at 10:45 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations on making it to the front page EOS. If you want to send me a picture of yourself, I’d be happy to post it alongside your comment.

  2. Posted January 20, 2010 at 3:50 am | Permalink

    It’s disappointing but, once again, the Democrats really have no one to blame but themselves and yet seem to be incapable of self-reflection. There was a lot of arrogance in assuming the seat belonged to them, just like Hillary Clinton thought she was entitled, and the threat of not certifying the election until after the health reform vote was exactly the type of corruption people were tired of in Massachusetts. I want reform but Pelosi and Reid still think that the ends justify the means no matter what. That strategy bit back and they are to blame.

  3. Michael Woodyard
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 6:48 am | Permalink

    I thought that once the house and senate passed their respective versions, the bills went to committee and then, once reconciled, it required merely a majority vote in both houses to pass the bill. Do I mis-remember School House Rock?

  4. elviscostello
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:04 am | Permalink

    Dear God, Please give Harry Reid a set of testicles and have him walk into Joe Lieberman’s office today and tell him to screw himself. Droopy dog is no Democrat and now that he is no longer the “magic 60th vote”, boot his ass out. Then go down, use the nuclear option and pass the reform, just like Bush passed the tax cuts. How come Dems have no spine?

  5. Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:09 am | Permalink

    Brown is hardly a staunch conservative. Quotes from his website follow.

    – Pro-choice, with a similar stance to Bill Clinton (“While this decision should ultimately be made by the woman in consultation with her doctor, I believe we need to reduce the number of abortions in America.”)
    – OK with state-by-state legalization of gay marriage through legislation and/or referendum (“I believe marriage is between a man and a woman. States should be free to make their own laws in this area, so long as they reflect the people’s will as expressed through them directly, or as expressed through their elected representatives.”)
    – Supports a two-state solution in the Middle East (“I support a two-state solution that reaffirms Israel’s right to exist and provides the Palestinians with a place of their own where both sides can live in peace and security.”)

    Sure he’s more conservative than Kennedy (that could be said of most Democrats too!), but he’s probably to the left of several congressional Democrats.

  6. Peter Larson
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:41 am | Permalink

    I find this to be a non-issue and hardly the great victory for rightists that it’s being touted to be.

    People act like we are going to enter an era where Roe v. Wade is overturned and we abolish science from schoolsand turn public schools into Christian madrasahs.

    The health bill, which noone has seem to have read, has middle of the road Republican written all over it. After some capitulations, it will be passed with moderate Repubican support. Too many people have too much invested in it at this point to have one single Senator from Mass. derail the whole thing.

  7. Kim
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:56 am | Permalink

    Pete’s right. The legislation isn’t progressive at all. Sure, there are some good things about it, but, by and large, it’s a giveaway to big health care companies. It didn’t start that way, though. If you’ll recall, there was a big push for a public option, which would have created a public entity to compete with health care. That failed. What we’re left with is a shell that’s been labeled “socialist” by the right, which couldn’t be further from the truth. And the only reason Republicans are against it is because doing so hurts the Dems. It’s pathetic.

  8. EOS
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 9:02 am | Permalink

    Michael – You’re right, but Reid and Pelosi are changing the game plan. If it goes to committee, they would have to allow the opposing party to have some input, and that’s what they want to avoid most. So, seeing as they got the 60 votes in the Senate already, Pelosi needs to put the Senate version of the bill before the House and get 51% to affirm. Then, the Senate takes a quick vote on the exact same bill they already approved. The hurdle that may be impossible to clear, that I alluded to earlier, is that the House bill does not approve of Federally funded abortions and there are a significant number of representatives that voted for the house version who would not vote for the Senate version.

    cmadler- I agree with your observations of Brown. He’s pro-choice. But in electing him, who won’t vote for the health bill for multiple other reasons, the pro-life side gains. The significant event is that Cokely had a twenty point lead in the polls on Dec. 19th, the State is overwhelmingly liberal, and they are opposed to the proposed health bill and the tactics of the Democrats.

    Peter – You won’t find a single fingerprint of any Republican on any page of this bill, much less their name written on it or any votes for it other than a couple of the fringe — maybe.

    Mark – It’s been a whirlwind week. Two persons agreed with me on something else I had written and now I get a byline on the front page. Excuse me for my disorientation, but I’m in unexplored territory.

  9. Robert
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    I more upset about EOS getting a front page than I am about Brown winning in Massachusetts.

  10. Glen S.
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    I’m not optimistic this will happen, but I hope the Massachusetts vote will be a “wake-up” call to the Obama administration that they need to stop chasing the illusion of bipartisanship (and stop kissing Joe Lieberman’s ass), and instead begin fighting on the side of the American people regarding the issues that got them elected in the first place — jobs, the economy and health care reform.

    First, he needs to push a second stimulus plan that begins putting people to work — immediately. By this, I mean less tax-credits and incentives … and more FDR-style jobs programs that take people out of unemployment lines and gets them earning a salary while contributing to the rebuilding of America’s crumbling infrastructure.

    Second, he needs to fire Geithner, Summers, Bernanke, etc., and send an unequivocal message to Wall Street and the banks that the days of “Too Big to Fail” are over, and that going forward, we are going to encourage financial services that encourage savings and investment in REAL products and services and REAL jobs; while discouraging the flow of dollars into speculation, arbitrage and disastrous commodity “bubbles.”

    Third, he needs to work with the Congressional Democratic leadership to scrap the ridiculous House and Senate health care “reform” bills as they currently exist, and begin working immediately to craft legislation that taxes the wealthiest Americans in order to create a strong public insurance option that guarantees an affordable, quality choice for all.

    Finally, he needs to re-instate Howard Dean and DNC chair, and let him begin rebuilding the brilliant 50-state strategy that was so successful in allowing the Democrats to regain their House and Senate majorities, and which, frankly, played a major role in Obama getting elected in the first place.

  11. wetdolphinmissile
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    Glen, if wishes were horses…

  12. elviscostello
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:31 am | Permalink

    Well written, Glen. This “move to the middle” and the capitulation by Obama and the dems to Wall Street, Big Pharma, Mountaintop Coal Removal companies, ad nauseum, makes me wish I’d have voted Green last election.

  13. Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:36 am | Permalink

    This is nothing more than victory number one in the 2010 election cycle for candidates supported by the independent Tea Party movement. Fiscally conservative, freedom loving, small government candidates, whether republican or otherwise, will do very well this year.

    I expect that democrats will be keeping as much distance from President Obama in 2010 as VP Gore did with President Clinton during his presidential run in 2000.

  14. Chelsea
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:36 am | Permalink

    FWIW, I voted, and didn’t choose the no-hope 3rd party candidate, as I usually do. However, I did pick the losing candidate–as I usually do.

  15. Elva
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 11:50 am | Permalink

    Well said, Glen.

    Mark, please move this up to the front page to cancel out the silliness of EOS.

  16. elviscostello
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 1:02 pm | Permalink

    Designated Republican, don’t you mean teabagger?

  17. Meta
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    Not that petitions help, but I liked this letter from From Move On:

    Dear MoveOn member,

    Watching a conservative Republican replace Ted Kennedy in the Senate is simply devastating.

    But as bad as the news is this morning, there’s actually one reason to be hopeful.

    For the last year, most Democrats in Washington have let lobbyists and corporate interests run roughshod over the people’s business. Wall Street got bailouts. Bankers got bonuses. Big Insurance rewrote the health care bill. Meanwhile, ordinary Americans continue to struggle to make ends meet.

    But now, finally, Democrats know they need to change course to win back voters’ confidence. The question is, will they learn exactly the wrong lesson? Will they give up on change altogether? Drop health care reform? Follow the lead of conservatives like Joe Lieberman and Evan Bayh and embrace “Republican-lite”?

    We need to make sure Democrats don’t get it wrong this time. It’s time to demand that they start truly fighting for working families. Pass real health care reform. Rein in Wall street. Take on the banks and special interests that stand in the way of change.

    Clicking here will add your name to the petition:

    http://pol.moveon.org/timetofight/

    The petition says, “Voters want real change. It’s time for the Democratic Party to stop siding with corporate interests and start fighting for working families.”

    If last night’s election result proves anything, it’s that voters are angry, and they want politicians who’ll stand up for them. So along with this petition, we’ll be delivering pitchforks—that time-honored symbol of populist rage—to the White House and every Democratic member of Congress. (Don’t worry, they’re made of plastic.)

    And if Democratic leaders want to show that they’re serious about helping regular folks, they can join with the progressives in Congress who are already leading the fight for bold change. But first they’re going to have to take on those in their own party who think it’s more important to protect corporate profits.

    The first step is to ignore the talking heads and pass a strong health care reform bill that would force big insurers to compete with a public health insurance option—even if that means they have to use the special reconciliation process to pass legislation without 60 votes in the Senate.

    And then to win in November, Democrats need to show they’re serious about restarting the economy by creating millions of new jobs—and crack down on the Wall Street banks that got us into this mess with tough new rules to stop their predatory behavior.

    Voters need to see Democrats fighting for them. It won’t be easy, and it will mean ignoring the corporate lobbyists who represent banks, insurance companies, and Big Oil. But that’s the point.

    Clicking here will add your name to the petition:

    http://pol.moveon.org/timetofight/

    Thanks you for all you do.

    –Justin, Carrie, Kat, Michael, and the rest of the team

  18. Peter Larson
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

    “Peter – You won’t find a single fingerprint of any Republican on any page of this bill, much less their name written on it or any votes for it other than a couple of the fringe — maybe.”

    You clearly have not read either version of the bill. Most of it is capitulations to get Republicans and conservative Democrats on board. Republicans can sit out because they can. It’s easy to scream “No” when you have little voting power.

    I’m glad to see the Democrats lose their 60 vote margin in the Senate. Maybe this will induce sitting Republicans to actually do something besides bitch and beat their chests like monkeys.

  19. Mr.Ed
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

    EOS, I’d like to offer you my swelling teabag of patriotism to suckle on.

  20. Posted January 20, 2010 at 7:32 pm | Permalink

    The Democratic Congressional leadership in Washington DC would not know a “working family” if they came into their office and whacked them over the head. If you want real change, then the 2010 “clean sweep” voting strategy is the only way to go.

  21. Peter Larson
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

    Change to what? Back to 2003? Did something amazing happen through the Republican controlled Congress and Executive that I am unaware of?

    Please tell me.

  22. Peter Larson
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 7:49 pm | Permalink

    OK, having read your post, I realize there’s more to it. Not terribly constructive, nor revolutionary but entertaining nonetheless.

  23. Posted January 20, 2010 at 7:53 pm | Permalink

    It’ll be interesting to see how, if at all, Obama will react to this. I’d love to see him take some of the advice offered here today, but I’m not sure that he’s got it in him. At least that’s my fear. I fear that maybe we all, in the wake of Bush, were too eager for change and projected upon him that he’s going to be this great progressive leader who brings back reality and wisdom to government and ushers in a new American century… But maybe he’s not that guy. Maybe, deep down, he’s the guy we’ve been watching this past year – just a conservative Democratic politician.

  24. Posted January 20, 2010 at 7:54 pm | Permalink

    Has anyone started making red, white and blue “clean sweep” brooms yet? If not, I want that concession.

  25. Bob
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:10 pm | Permalink

    Obamas next move should be firing Rahm Emmanuel. He has stupidly bought in to Emmanuels belief that progressives/independents will support him no matter what he does because we have nowhere else to go.

  26. Posted January 20, 2010 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

    Amen to that.

  27. Posted January 20, 2010 at 9:00 pm | Permalink

    And, judging from this letter that I just received from the folks at BarackObama.com, it doesn’t sound as though they’re going to change one damned thing.

    Mark —

    Yesterday’s disappointing election results show deep discontent with the pace of change. I know the OFA community and the President share that frustration.

    We also saw what we knew to be true all along: Any change worth making is hard and will be fought at every turn. While it doesn’t take away the sting of this loss, there is no road to real change without setbacks along the way.

    We could have simply sought to do things that were easy, that wouldn’t stir up controversy. But changes that aren’t controversial rarely solve the problem.

    Our country continues to face the same fundamental challenges it faced yesterday. Our health care system still needs reform. Wall Street still needs to be held accountable. We still need to create good jobs. And we still need to continue building a clean energy economy.

    The President isn’t walking away from these challenges. In fact, his determination and resolve are only stronger. We must match that commitment with our own.

    But it won’t be easy. Real change never is. For that reason, I am grateful you’re part of this fight with us.

    Thank you,

    Mitch

    Mitch Stewart
    Director
    Organizing for America

  28. Posted January 20, 2010 at 9:05 pm | Permalink

    As for Scott Brown, if Glenn Beck is right, we won’t have to worry about him for long. No, Beck seems to think that he’ll kill an intern.

  29. Taco Tom
    Posted January 20, 2010 at 10:46 pm | Permalink

    Don’t read too much into this vote. The majority of voters are vastly under-educated about the issues. It’s really simple: economy is bad, vote against the party in power, economy good, vote for ’em.

  30. Posted January 21, 2010 at 8:38 am | Permalink

    Fivethirtyeight.com has a good post on where the current crop of Democratic leaders has gone wrong: “Post-Partisanship Epic Fail?

  31. Ed Turmo
    Posted January 21, 2010 at 9:03 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the link, C Man. It’s a good article.

  32. Brackinald Achery
    Posted January 21, 2010 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Seems to me, this seat is a welcome throw-away for the Democratic leadership. Now they can somewhat more credibly blame the Republicans again for their own suckitude (regarding not changing policy with the “war/s”, a sell-out healthcare bill, complicity in the bailouts, etc) and redirect their base’s anger away from themselves. Republican = bad, democrat = good again, just like base likes it.

  33. Publius
    Posted January 21, 2010 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

    With all due respect, it’s the people’s seat. Coakley and Obama lost big because they are ignoring the will of the people. Over 60% of the people don’t want the health care atrocity bill. I’d say the system works.

  34. Robert
    Posted January 26, 2010 at 1:13 pm | Permalink

    The significance of this is being overplayed by both sides. The underdog party in any state has its best chances in a special election like this. That is especially true when the underdog is the GOP due to the fact that almost everywhere higher turnout benefits the Democrats.

    For one thing, money flowed in from the entire country for Brown because it was the only race in the country at the moment.

    The turnout was 54% of what it was in the 2008 general, and only about 40% of total registered voters. In that perfect environment for the GOP, they got 51.9% of the vote – not a terribly huge margin. It couldn’t be repeated under even slightly less favorable circumstances.

    The Democrats’ loss of the Governor’s race in New Jersey back in November was a more significant upset statistically.

    Of course the GOP and the Tea Party are going to get as much PR from this Brown win as they can. Likewise, the Democrats are going to try to use it as a “wake-up” call to their base of Obama supporters. Therefore, everybody has an interest in exaggerating the significance of Brown’s win.

    Here’s my prediction; No matter what happens, that seat will be held by a Democrat by 1/4/2013. Either Brown will switch parties or he’ll be beat in the 2012 general…even if Obama loses his bid for a second term in the same vote.

    I’ll take bets on that one if anybody’s interested.

  35. Phelps
    Posted February 23, 2010 at 10:03 am | Permalink

    Scott Brown is really pissing off the Republicans for his vote with the President yesterday on the Jobs bill.

    Check out the anger:

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Scott-Brown/178795233167?v=feed&story_fbid=325681096282

    Now, I wonder if he’d support health care reform.

  36. Kevin Paul
    Posted February 23, 2010 at 10:46 am | Permalink

    Last week they were all screaming that he was the 2nd coming of Reagan – the savior of the party. Remember how people on the right were saying that he was Presidential material? You’re not hearing that so much today.

  37. johnqpublic
    Posted February 23, 2010 at 5:42 pm | Permalink

    Quote:”Here’s my prediction; No matter what happens, that seat will be held by a Democrat by 1/4/2013″

    Sure it will!!

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

  38. Posted February 23, 2010 at 8:39 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know if I’d go so far as to say that I’m impressed by Brown, but it definitely took balls to stand up and vote with the President on the Jobs legislation. Even if it was good for his constituents, I’m sure it wasn’t an easy choice to make, as it may well have ended his Presidential aspirations.

  39. dragon
    Posted February 23, 2010 at 11:52 pm | Permalink

    Heck of a Job, Brownie!

  40. Kim
    Posted February 24, 2010 at 6:50 am | Permalink

    They already have universal health care in Mass, so, conventional wisdom seems to be that Brown wouldn’t vote with the Dems on a public option. Maybe that’s not the case though. It would certainly be cool if he could be the 51st vote.

  41. Robert
    Posted February 24, 2010 at 9:17 am | Permalink

    johnqpublic, you’re a complete idiot if you don’t know that. I am willing to put up any bet on it. Let’s make it a $1,000. What do you say, moron?

  42. Posted April 12, 2010 at 8:50 pm | Permalink

    Headline: Scott Brown Snubs Tea Party

  43. Robert
    Posted May 5, 2011 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

    More conclusive evidence proving Senator Scott Brown is a moron:

    http://news.bostonherald.com/news/politics/view/2011_0505dems_blast_brown_over_fake_bin_laden_photo/srvc=home&position=4

  44. Robert
    Posted May 6, 2011 at 10:05 am | Permalink

    Any idiot who is suckered by internet hoaxes can not serve responsibly in public office. They are simply too stupid to do anything but harm to the interests of those they represent.

  45. Robert
    Posted May 9, 2012 at 9:15 am | Permalink

    I’ll bet johnqpublic or any other similar idiot that Scott Brown is defeated by Elizabeth Warren. Let’s make it $50 for every “HA” in your post above.

  46. Robert
    Posted November 4, 2012 at 11:22 am | Permalink

    johnqpublic is probably a pretty good name for that idiot. After all, the vast majority of the population of this country is right about on his level intellectually.

    All it takes is a very basic level of understanding of demographics and statistics to know Scott Brown can not win in a standard general election as a Republican.

    Even a much better candidate than Brown would still get beat, and even by a much worse candidate than Elizabeth Warren. The demographics simply make it impossible for a flake like Brown to beat a reasonably acceptable candidate like Warren.

    Where is that moron, johnqpublic, now? Where do any of these anonymous idiots go when their previous statements prove conclusively once again that they are nothing but obnoxious dumbfucks?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Connect

BUY LOCAL... or shop at Amazon through this link Banner Initiative Ruth Marks