Ted Kennedy, the death penalty, healthcare reform, ramming things up the ass of Congress, and Obama’s penis

It looks like Texas may have put an innocent man to death.

The Birthers are demanding to see Obama’s penis.

And Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate, has died, leaving behind one hell of a legacy, and, unfortunately, one fewer vote for the President’s healthcare initiative. Kennedy, as you may know, has been a champion of comprehensive healthcare reform for decades, which makes it especially painful that he would pass now, as we stand on the cusp of finally doing what needs to be done. Senator Robert Byrd, a close friend of Kennedy’s, had the following to say this morning.

…My heart and soul weeps at the loss of my best friend in the Senate. In his honor and as a tribute to his commitment to his ideals, let us stop the shouting and name calling and have a civilized debate on health-care reform which I hope, when legislation has been signed into law, will bear his name for his commitment to insuring the health of every American…

And I know it’s not quite as eloquent, but, on the same subject, the following comment from Metafilter really resonated with me today as well.

I want the health care bill passed by reconciliation RIGHT FUCKING NOW and I want it called Edward Moore Kennedy Comprehensive Health Care. Fuck this bi-partisan BULLSHIT; it’s never going to happen. Put single-payer back in the bill and RAM IT UP CONGRESS’S ASS.

I may be a little emotionally overwhelmed.

Seriously, I hope Kennedy’s death, if nothing else, reminds us how long and hard this battle has been, and how imperative it is that we act now, and act boldly, while we have public support and both houses of Congress. If it doesn’t happen now, it never will… And we owe it to Ted to stop fucking around and see this accomplished. And, I think, by all means we should do it in his name.

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8 Comments

  1. Posted August 26, 2009 at 10:21 pm | Permalink

    Obama just sent out the following letter.

    Michelle and I were heartbroken to learn this morning of the death of our dear friend, Senator Ted Kennedy.

    For nearly five decades, virtually every major piece of legislation to advance the civil rights, health and economic well-being of the American people bore his name and resulted from his efforts.

    His ideas and ideals are stamped on scores of laws and reflected in millions of lives — in seniors who know new dignity; in families that know new opportunity; in children who know education’s promise; and in all who can pursue their dream in an America that is more equal and more just, including me.

    In the United States Senate, I can think of no one who engendered greater respect or affection from members of both sides of the aisle. His seriousness of purpose was perpetually matched by humility, warmth and good cheer. He battled passionately on the Senate floor for the causes that he held dear, and yet still maintained warm friendships across party lines. And that’s one reason he became not only one of the greatest senators of our time, but one of the most accomplished Americans ever to serve our democracy.

    I personally valued his wise counsel in the Senate, where, regardless of the swirl of events, he always had time for a new colleague. I cherished his confidence and momentous support in my race for the Presidency. And even as he waged a valiant struggle with a mortal illness, I’ve benefited as President from his encouragement and wisdom.

    His fight gave us the opportunity we were denied when his brothers John and Robert were taken from us: the blessing of time to say thank you and goodbye. The outpouring of love, gratitude and fond memories to which we’ve all borne witness is a testament to the way this singular figure in American history touched so many lives.

    For America, he was a defender of a dream. For his family, he was a guardian. Our hearts and prayers go out to them today — to his wonderful wife, Vicki, his children Ted Jr., Patrick and Kara, his grandchildren and his extended family.

    Today, our country mourns. We say goodbye to a friend and a true leader who challenged us all to live out our noblest values. And we give thanks for his memory, which inspires us still.

    Sincerely,

    President Barack Obama

    Sadly, nothing about “ramming it up the ass of Congress” for Ted.

  2. Posted August 26, 2009 at 10:27 pm | Permalink

    And let me preempt the inevitable Chappaquiddick comments by saying that I agree, based on the evidence that I’ve seen, the Senator acted horribly in the wake of that unfortunate accident. He was not by any means a perfect man, especially in his youth. I do feel, however, that he tried to right those wrongs later in life through his work. And for that I mourn his passing tonight.

  3. jean
    Posted August 26, 2009 at 10:55 pm | Permalink

    Teddy was a drunk and drunks do some shitty stuff, but Teddy was also a great man, a mediator. He got things done without rancor. And when he had to, he turned the screws on the son-a-bitches. He reminded liberals what we stood for and why we needed to stand our ground. And he chased skirts. If someone out there can claim to be entirely consistent in thought, word and action, go ahead, throw the first stone.
    I’ve been remembering South Africa today— How it felt like we were getting nowhere… Reagan was the teflon president. Then Teddy went to South Africa in 1985, following in the footsteps of RFK years before. He stayed with Bishop Tutu in Soweto and said essentially ‘I believe in fundamental human rights. This can not stand.’ And suddenly, we had some traction. The next thing we know there are sanctions and Reagan’s veto is overturned. He broke through the bullshit. He broke through the teflon. He put his arm around Orin Hatch and turned him into a decent thoughtful guy for a minute or two. I hope his memory chastens the national brawl over healthcare reform into a proactive, humane, problem-solving discussion. Absent that. Fine, let’s take a swig and shove it up their asses.

  4. jean
    Posted August 26, 2009 at 11:05 pm | Permalink

    The more our feelings diverge, the more deeply felt they are, the greater is our obligation to grant the sincerity and essential decency of our fellow citizens on the other side. . . .

    In short, I hope for an America where neither “fundamentalist” nor “humanist” will be a dirty word, but a fair description of the different ways in which people of good will look at life and into their own souls.

    I hope for an America where no president, no public official, no individual will ever be deemed a greater or lesser American because of religious doubt — or religious belief….

    I hope for an America where the power of faith will always burn brightly, but where no modern inquisition of any kind will ever light the fires of fear, coercion, or angry division.

    I hope for an America where we can all contend freely and vigorously, but where we will treasure and guard those standards of civility which alone make this nation safe for both democracy and diversity.

    — T. Kennedy, October 3, 1983

  5. Andy C
    Posted August 26, 2009 at 11:20 pm | Permalink

    He was a great man and accomplished so much. No retirement, he fought till the end.

    I’m sitting here working late listening to Judas Priest as I read this and the song “Ram It Down” came on. It’s a sign!!!!

  6. Posted August 27, 2009 at 7:12 am | Permalink

    It has been said too many times that he never lived up to his potential, that he will forever be overshadowed by his two brothers. I disagree. Given the limited time that fate would allow them, their legacies are decidedly eclipsed by their little brother’s. As John Meacham said this morning on the Morning Joe program, “He certainly belongs in the company of Henry Clay and Daniel Webster.” As legislators, Jack and Bobby aren’t even in Teddy’s league. It’s not even close.

    So many “red state Americans” who regarded him with suspicion if not outright hatred, will probably never even realize how much they owe Senator Kennedy. It’s kind of sad that a lot of the people Kennedy worked the hardest for despised him with a passion born of decades of anti-Kennedy propaganda. Nothing was handier for a Republican running in a conservative district than the image of Bogeyman Ted in a campaign ad. It usually worked.

    TEDDY KENNEDY’S GONNA GET’CHA IF YA DON’T WATCH OUT!

    I wonder how these people would react if tomorrow – just for a day, mind you – every law Teddy Kennedy is responsible for were made null and void. Call it a hunch but I have a strong feeling that more people than you might suspect are going to miss him now that he’s gone.

    Teddy, they hardly knew ye!

    We’re a better country because for seventy-seven years Teddy Kennedy walked amongst us. His impact on the country he loved so much will be felt for generations. The loss his passing means to progressive politics in the United States is incalculable. We need him at this moment in history more than we ever needed him before. It’s so unspeakably sad. He’s gone and he’s not coming back. Now he belongs to the ages.

    In the good old Irish Catholic tradition, tonight I’ll be drinking a toast or two (or twelve) to you, Ted. Sleep well and thanks.

    http://www.tomdegan.blogspot.com

    Tom Degan
    Goshen, NY

  7. Posted August 27, 2009 at 9:37 am | Permalink

    The Lion…Err Dog of the Senate.
    “Teddy Kennedy was the weak kitten in the litter, never able to measure up to his brothers.
    The accident at Chappaquiddick displayed his chronic immaturity. One problem Teddy has always had was keeping it in his pants – even when other people are around.”
    – Cleo O’Donnell – wife of former Kennedy campaign aide.
    Check out my take, and stick around for more good content.
    http://libertarianhumor.com/2009/08/26/the-lion-err-dog-of-the-senate/

  8. Michael Schils
    Posted August 27, 2009 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    Big Ed, do you have any sources for your list of TK’s “accomplishments”?

    The reason I ask is that several of your anecdotal claims are a bit difficult to picture. For instance, how do you know that TK got into an argument with some guys, jumped on their boat, and threw eight of them in the ocean? I mean, TK was not really that big of a guy. It would seem that after he threw, say, four of them overboard, he would be tired enough that the others would be able to resist his rage.

    I don’t know if the media is showing TK footage ad nauseum because they are “leftest”. (Tell your editor that should be “leftist” with an “i”.) I think the media is just lazy and would rather sit around and play films rather than do any real work.

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