John Stewart shakes the limp, lifeless body of Jim Cramer in his foamy jaws of death

This is why TV exists.

All other so-called news programs should be ashamed of themselves. It’s a sad commentary on America that our best reporting is done by a room full of comedy writers.

[update: I got about 1,500 spam comments on this post, so I had to disable the comments section. If you really want to say something, send me an email and I’ll add it for you.]

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11 Comments

  1. Brackinald Achery
    Posted March 13, 2009 at 8:30 pm | Permalink

    NIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICE!!!

  2. Dirtgrain
    Posted March 14, 2009 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    I hate that uncomfortable feeling I get watching a guy like that squirming, but he totally deserves it. Then again, people following Cramer’s lead get what they deserve. The bigger point about reporting is spot on, although the focus should have been on the whole bogus system of these “news” networks and their corporate direction.

    To get a show like Cramer’s, a person seemingly has to sell out. We should boycott watching sell-outs on TV. We should demand more. I’ve been boycotting TV news for a while.

  3. Kripen
    Posted March 14, 2009 at 11:51 am | Permalink

    Is that the longest Jon Stewart interview ever?

  4. Posted March 14, 2009 at 12:06 pm | Permalink

    From Salon:

    Thursday night, during his epic pantsing of the “Mad Money” host, Jon Stewart talked about his impression that there are two wholly different versions of Jim Cramer out there. On Friday, Cramer proved Stewart right, though perhaps not in the way the “Daily Show” anchor had intended.

    During his “Daily Show” appearance, Cramer was constantly deferential and apologetic, at times even catching himself when he tried to offer an excuse for past behavior. And ultimately, he promised to change his ways, which include, as Gawker noted, a history of alleged attempts to manipulate the market using his position as a financial analyst both in print and on television and his connections within the media.

    At first, during the beginning of his own show on Friday, he appeared to have truly meant what he said the night before.

    “Before we get started, I want to say something about, about what happened yesterday. A lot of people are talking about what happened: I want to be very clear, I want to be very clear that, although I was clearly outside of my safety zone, I have my utmost respect for this person and the work that they do no matter,” Cramer said, appearing to choke up a bit before continuing, “no matter how uncomfortable it was to be on. So I want you to take a look at this clip from yesterday of Cramer vs. Stewart.”

    But the video that Cramer then showed his audience wasn’t from the public beating he took on “The Daily Show” — it was from the appearance he’d made on Martha Stewart’s show earlier in the day on Thursday, when the two had made banana cream pies together. (The chyron that appeared as Cramer introduced the video, “Going on Stewart’s show was a complete cake walk,” was probably the tip-off.)

    With that, and a winking question asking whether anyone minds if he still uses the buttons that provide his show’s trademark sound effects, the show was off and running, back to normal…

  5. Posted March 14, 2009 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

    I only get about 8 TV stations and Comedy Central isn’t one of them. When I do watch, I watch short clips online. I don’t know that I’ve ever seen a full show from beginning to end. So, I don’t know how long interviews generally are. This one does seem long, though, and, on the Comedy Central site, they even have an “unedited” version. I’ve yet to watch it, but it would stand to reason that it’s even longer. So, yeah, they gave this subject a lot of attention. And they’ve been building to this for the past few weeks. Stewart really seems to be hitting his stride with this stuff.

  6. John on Forest
    Posted March 14, 2009 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

    Jon Stewart doesn’t spell his name with an “h” like I do.

  7. Kerri
    Posted March 14, 2009 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

    Yes, it is “Jon” Stewart, with no h. And Stewart, with no Leibowitz.

    The interviews are usually 5-10 min. long on the show. This one was unusually long, most likely because of all of the media attention and because there had been a back and forth between Stewart and Cramer all week. This was the showdown so they gave it extra time.

    I just hope this leads to Cramer’s stupid show getting canceled, just as Stewart helped “Crossfire” meet its deserved end.

  8. Posted March 14, 2009 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    Well, tho well done, this guy is just one small piece of a larger ‘in bed with them’ denial system that is huge, no?

    Great clip Mark! yeh, “comedy”

  9. Posted March 15, 2009 at 8:06 am | Permalink

    I watched the unedited version. It was a beautiful and scary at the same time. Very similar to how Jon took on Crossfire several years ago. I watched a bit of the build up too and he was hammering CNBC pretty hard. They deserve it, honestly.

    BTW I turned off the TV 8 years ago and never looked back. It took me two years living in this house to notice that there are no cable runs in the house anywhere. I occasionally try to watch it at other peoples homes, but can’t see why anyone still watches. It made my head hurt in a very bad way. Quite frankly, I’d rather pay a small licensing fee to the shows I want to watch directly and be able to download it, rather than deal with the mess Television has become. There are still good shows (ie Battlestar Galactica, The Daily Show) but they are less numerous than the trite crap that is put up in between.

  10. Brackinald Achery
    Posted March 15, 2009 at 1:09 pm | Permalink

    Who’s this Faber fellow Stewart approved of as one of the few on CNBC who was honest?

  11. Brackinald Achery
    Posted March 15, 2009 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    Ah, here he is. Marc Faber on cnbc, Jon Stewart’s example of one of a very few honest economists on cnbc.

    This is part 2. My favorite part starts around 2:20.

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