i expect great things from you

OK, I’m going out to get something to eat, and, when I get back, I expect there to be really great comments waiting for me…

Seriously, let’s pretend for a while that this is your blog… What would you be writing about?

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26 Comments

  1. grr
    Posted October 11, 2006 at 5:34 pm | Permalink

    How about thrash covers by pre-pubescent kids?

    http://www.poetv.com/video.php?vid=7657

  2. terrygilmer
    Posted October 11, 2006 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

    Sorry, I don’t have anything to write about as I’ve been watching the new Tarantino Grindhouse trailer.
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=bUuuBe4Glmk
    I would however like to read more about Gilligan’s Island like the Seven Deadly Sins theory e.g. Ginger is lust, Gilligan is sloth, etc. or how the show is just one big indictment of class struggle. I wrote about this in college but my teacher was unimpressed.

  3. Anonymous
    Posted October 11, 2006 at 7:08 pm | Permalink

    Dear Mark,

    ADDISON Technology has finished the evaluation of Fluke Networks

  4. egpenet
    Posted October 11, 2006 at 7:40 pm | Permalink

    SUNDAY NY TIMES MAGAZINE cover story about significant familial/generational changes in elephant herds in Africa and India … various causes … but bottom line creating a breakdown in behaviors leading to rampages against encroaching humans, other elephants, rhinos, other animals … gang behavior among young males … culled herds’ losses of mothering females and aunts leaving young elephants without female nurture and fatherly direction … etc.

    Seems familiar … from the urbs and ex-urbs to Uganda and the Punjab … a very distrubing story.

  5. UBU
    Posted October 11, 2006 at 10:10 pm | Permalink

    How I have too much pride to beg for comments from my thousands of loyal readers…

  6. ChelseaL
    Posted October 12, 2006 at 8:16 am | Permalink

    The Lion and the Mouse (attributed to Aesop):

    A mouse was scampering along the jungle floor, not paying much attention to where it was going. In an instant, a huge lion grabbed it by the tail and dangled it above his enormous mouth.

    The terrified mouse, certain it was her last moment on earth, managed to squeak out a plea:

    “Mighty lion, please spare my life. Who knows? Maybe one day, I can do *you* a good turn.”

    The lion hesitated just long enough to consider the mouse’s words. He was hungry–and now kind of embarrassed– and that annoyed him.

    “Yah, right,” he says, “A little mouse. You’re gonna do me some big favor some day. Ok, fine,” he huffs. “Get out of my sight.”

    The mouse assures him he won’t regret his kindness, and before the lion has a chance to reconsider, scampers away as fast as she can.

    Then one day, to the mouse’s surprise, she hears the lion roaring loudly in pain, and runs over to see what the trouble is. A thorn is caught in the lion’s paw and the poor creature can’t remove it. Of course, it proves an easy job for the small, dexterous mouse.

    Some time later, the lion gets caught in a hunter’s net. He growls frantically and, once more, the mouse hears his call. Remembering the lion’s prior kindness and gratitude, the mouse gnaws at the netting until there is a big enough tear that the lion can free himself.

    The moral of the story: It’s easy to be nice to bigshots who look as if they can help you. But be nice to the small and powerless, too, because fortunes change, and because you never know who may be able to help you under what circumstances. (And because it’s good karma.) Life is strange.

  7. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 12, 2006 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    Ah, let me add one of my favorite fables: Ambrose Bierce’s version of the old Aesop favorite.

    THE GRASSHOPPER AND THE ANT

    One day in winter a hungry Grasshopper applied to an Ant for some of the food which they had stored.

    “Why,” said the Ant, “did you not store up some food for yourself instead of singing all the time?”

    “So I did,” said the Grasshopper; “so I did; but you fellows broke in and carried it all away.”

  8. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 12, 2006 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    Ah, let me add one of my favorite fables: Ambrose Bierce’s version of the old Aesop favorite.

    THE GRASSHOPPER AND THE ANT

    One day in winter a hungry Grasshopper applied to an Ant for some of the food which they had stored.

    “Why,” said the Ant, “did you not store up some food for yourself instead of singing all the time?”

    “So I did,” said the Grasshopper; “so I did; but you fellows broke in and carried it all away.”

  9. UncleWendy
    Posted October 12, 2006 at 11:39 pm | Permalink

    The best 80s movie soundtrack ever. Was it Xanadu? Short Circuit? Valley Girl? I’m not going to admit that I’d consider Dirty Dancing among them.

  10. ChelseaL
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 6:36 am | Permalink

    Skinner:

    I LOVE Bierce. Ask Mark. I sent him a copy of the Devil’s Dictionary.

  11. j7uy5
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 7:58 am | Permalink

    You should write about what happened to the siamese twin boys who married siamese twin girls, then there was law passed that defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman, and how they struggled against the system, and eventually the girl twins got elected as president and vice-president, and it was a glorious triumph.

  12. mark
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 8:49 am | Permalink

    Thank you all for your comments and your links. They’re really helping me make it through this cold… Please send more if/when you can.

    And, unless I’m forgetting something, the best 80’s movie soundtrack is “Athens, Georgia – Inside/Out.”

  13. ol' e cross
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 1:57 pm | Permalink

    I’d blog about two articles in today’s Ann Arbor News.

    One that discloses the
    earnings of EMU faculty (they FIOAed the numbers).

    The second reports that our deer David
    Kircher was found guilty
    . Sentencing is Dec. 6.

  14. ol' e cross
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 1:57 pm | Permalink

    I’d blog about two articles in today’s Ann Arbor News.

    One that discloses the
    earnings of EMU faculty (they FIOAed the numbers).

    The second reports that our deer David
    Kircher was found guilty
    . Sentencing is Dec. 6.

  15. ol' e cross
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

    And, given that Mark cheated by selecting a music documentary, I cast my 80s soundtrack vote to Repo Man.

    It had Iggy.

  16. ol' e cross
    Posted October 13, 2006 at 4:18 pm | Permalink

    And, given that Mark cheated by selecting a music documentary, I cast my 80s soundtrack vote to Repo Man.

    It had Iggy.

  17. Dirtgrain
    Posted October 14, 2006 at 9:05 am | Permalink

    I’d be blogging about the David Hasselhof/Wayne Newton conspiracy.

  18. Andy
    Posted October 14, 2006 at 11:16 am | Permalink

    Duke Duke Duke Duke of Earl Duke Duke Duke of Earl Duke Duke Duke of Earl Duke Duke

  19. mark
    Posted October 14, 2006 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    There’s a David Hasselhof/Wayne Newton conspiracy!!!

    [OK, excuse me now while I go running off to see if there’s some kind of hidden message to me in the lyrics of “Duke of Earl”… Or, did they perhaps use that song on the Repo Man soundtrack? It’s been 20 years since I’ve seen it… I hate it when I don’t get references.]

  20. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 15, 2006 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    Chelsea! Many of Bierce’s fables can be found online at http://www.analitica.com/bitblio/bierce/fables.asp. Even more can be found in S.T. Joshi’s compilation from Ohio State University Press: a wonderful edition.

    Another topic for discussion: the “NY Times” story Friday about China’s proposed laws to crack down on sweatshops and labor abuse — and opposition to it from US and other corporations.

    I hope that cold’s better. I hear absinthe helps.

  21. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 15, 2006 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    Chelsea! Many of Bierce’s fables can be found online at http://www.analitica.com/bitblio/bierce/fables.asp. Even more can be found in S.T. Joshi’s compilation from Ohio State University Press: a wonderful edition.

    Another topic for discussion: the “NY Times” story Friday about China’s proposed laws to crack down on sweatshops and labor abuse — and opposition to it from US and other corporations.

    I hope that cold’s better. I hear absinthe helps.

  22. ChelseaL
    Posted October 16, 2006 at 6:57 am | Permalink

    Thanks, Skinner. Much appreciated.

    Cheers,
    C

  23. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 16, 2006 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

    Chelsea — Happy reading! And keep an eye out for that Joshi edition; it has over 400 previously uncollected fables. Most are strictly topical, but there are many gems.

    I keep wanting to set up a reading of “Oil of Dog” (one of my favorites) for Halloween. Maybe the Ypsians can take up the idea.

  24. It's Skinner Again
    Posted October 16, 2006 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

    Chelsea — Happy reading! And keep an eye out for that Joshi edition; it has over 400 previously uncollected fables. Most are strictly topical, but there are many gems.

    I keep wanting to set up a reading of “Oil of Dog” (one of my favorites) for Halloween. Maybe the Ypsians can take up the idea.

  25. Teddy Glass Esq.
    Posted October 16, 2006 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

    The porn shop we just put out of business on Michigan Avenue was, oddly enough, called “Oil the Dog.”

  26. mark
    Posted October 16, 2006 at 9:24 pm | Permalink

    For those interested,

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